[gallery] In the shadow of the Houses of Parliament in Westminster stands the bronze figure of Emmeline Pankhurst, leader of the suffragette movement and founder of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) who adopted the cry “deeds not words”. Sculptor; A.G Walker (1930)...

      [gallery] This anonymous figure in Stockwell Memorial Garden, South London is based on a poem of the same name by Guyana-born Cecile Nobrega. It’s the first statue of a black women to be on permanent public display. The Sculptor is Aleix Barbat.Here’s the original poem: Find me...

        [gallery] This bust in Gordon Square Gardens, Bloomsbury (WC1H) depicts Noor Inayat Khan a British Agent who worked in France during WWII. For three months, she single-handedly ran a cell of agents across Paris, frequently changing her appearance and name until she was eventually captured. Despite...

          [gallery] The celebrated ballet dancer Anna Pavlova is most recognized for the creation of the role the Dying Swan and, with her own ballet company, became the first ballerina to tour around the world. Her statue can be seen on top of the Palace Theatre in...

            [gallery] This landmark statue was built as a monument to Anthony Ashley Cooper, the 7th Earl of Shaftsbury. He worked tirelessly to promote the rights of the poor and down-trodden, inspired by his strong Evangelical faith. Later in life he became an MP but instead of...

              [gallery] This striking monument commemorates Margaret MacDonald who from 1890 (when she was 20) began devoting her time and energy to organisations focussed on improving the lives of the working class, particularly women. The sculpture contains this inscription; ‘She brought joy to those with whom she lived...

                [gallery] Christchurch Gardens SW1 (near St James’ Station) This scroll-like sculpture is a tribute to the Suffragette Fellowship, established in 1926 to preserve the history and spirit of the struggle of the fight for women’s right to vote and emancipation. It was unveiled in 1970 by Lilian Lenton,...

                  [gallery] Aske’s Hospital, named after Robert Aske, was one of the earliest and grandest almshouses in Shoreditch. Almshouses were charitable associations providing housing; Robert Aske bequeathed the money to the Haberdashers’ Company in 1689. Now the surrounding buildings are private housing but in the 17th century the almshouses...

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